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The Soul of Leadership with Sam Morris

– Founder of Zen Warrior Training –

Intro to Episode

Welcome to the From Adversity to Awakening podcast, where we explore transformative journeys of resilience and self-discovery. In this episode, we’re honored to have as our guest, Sam Morris, a beacon of strength and wisdom. As the founder of Zen Warrior Training, Sam brings unparalleled expertise in guiding individuals, teams, and organizations towards a leadership mindset rooted in mindfulness and empowerment.


Despite facing life-altering adversity, Sam’s journey from paralysis to profound spiritual awakening showcases the power of resilience and the human spirit. Join us as we delve into Sam’s extraordinary insights and learn how to navigate life’s challenges with grace and resilience.

Play Video about Sam Morris
February 5, 2024

Interview Summary

Host Peggy O’Neill welcomes special guest Sam Morris to discuss his journey from adversity to awakening. Sam, the owner of Zen Warrior Training, shares his story of becoming paraplegic at 24 and transforming his hardships into spiritual connection and joy.

The conversation covers Sam’s initial struggles, including bed sores and hospitalization, and how coaching and self-awareness played a crucial role in his transformation. Sam emphasizes the importance of attuning to the present moment, letting go of egoic identity, and making choices aligned with one’s true self. The discussion touches on the insidious nature of self-conscious loops, the power of self-awareness, and the continuous process of growth. Sam encourages listeners to explore a deeper relationship with their entire bodies and shift attention from constant thought to the present moment.

Both Peggy and Sam highlight the significance of choosing one’s direction in life, breaking free from limiting beliefs, and recognizing the power of manifestation. The conversation concludes with a shared perspective on the ongoing, evolving nature of the enlightenment process. Overall, the podcast delves into profound insights about personal growth, self-awareness, and embracing the unknown to find true freedom and joy.

Bio

Sam Warren Morris is the founder of Zen Warrior Training and the creator of Leadership TectonX, a leadership performance program that focuses on cultivating the optimal mindset for navigating the most disruptive period in human history with effectiveness and agility. In 1999, just after leading a cycling trek across the United States, Sam was in a car accident which left him paraplegic.


Moving through the trauma of paralysis gave Sam a deeply embodied appreciation for the ability for the mind and body to adapt and find the gifts in any challenge. Currently, in addition to his work with entrepreneurs and executives, Sam is developing a leadership mindset training program for caregivers caring for individuals who have are rehabilitating from a neurological trauma. Sam is also developing a docuseries about the world’s most highly accomplished disabled outdoor adventure leaders and authoring a book.

Video Transcript

*This transcript was generated automatically. Its accuracy may vary.

Hi, welcome everybody.
Welcome to the From Adversity to Awakening show.
I’m your host Peggy O’Neill.
I’m so glad you’re here today.
I have a very special guest, Sam Morris, ta-da-da-da.
And Sam is going to share with us his story about moving from adversity to awakening,
transforming his hardships into greater spiritual connection and joy.
So welcome Sam.
Yeah, yeah, nice to see you.
So Sam and I met at H.E.L. a couple of months ago, the Association of Transformational Leaders,
and he had a very stellar presence.
And we got to chatting.
We had a very meaningful conversation.
I asked him to come enlighten you all about what he, enlighten you from his perspective,
his wisdom that he’s gained through his life.
So Sam is the owner and presenter and the generator of an organization called Zen Warrior
Training.
And he helps individuals and teams and corporation and other places to bring in leadership mindset.
So this is an awesome empowering thing.
And I also love that Sam, I have to read it, is a ambassador of no barriers USA, which
empowers people with disabilities to live with no boundaries.
So Sam, as you can’t see in a wheelchair, he’s had an accident 24 years ago.
And for the last 10 years, he has discovered his inner light and been shining it into the
world.
So welcome Sam.
Thank you, Peggy.
Thank you.
It’s so great to be here with you.
Yeah, thanks to be here with you.
So I would love for you to share with our audience who are eager to hear your stories.
So compelling.
I can, what do they call that, spoiler alert, about your journey with having adversity,
like the biggest adversity that, or adversities that you have experienced in your life and
how that impacted you from at the beginning about then the transfer.
Yeah.
Yeah.
Yeah.
So my big adversity started a little over 24 years ago, which was, I just got to the
point since I’m 48 right now, I just got to the point where I’ve now spent more of my
life paraplegic than I did before then.
But I was 24 when the accident that left me paraplegic happened.
I was riding the backseat of a car with a driver with a driver who had been drinking.
He lost control of the car, went off the road, hit a tree.
And my spine broke at the level of T-12, which is around where your belly button is.
So I became completely paralyzed, no sensation, no motor function from that point down when
that happened.
And I just finished cycling across the United States when that happened.
So I was really athletic.
I was not this type of person who was just sitting around all day.
I was someone who was using his legs all the time.
You know, it was not just walking, but cycling, snowboarding, skiing, et cetera.
It was my whole lifestyle and whole identity really revolved around the use of my entire
body.
I was six foot three, suddenly in a wheelchair.
But that was only the beginning.
And your eye level with me.
No, eye level with you exactly, exactly, exactly.
Maybe even a little bit taller actually.
But yeah, not only, but that was just kind of the beginning of the adversity actually.
And what many people don’t realize is that I spent years in and out of hospitals with
bed sores, which turned into large ulcers, which I had to have surgery on.
And I actually spent over two years completely immobilized in hospital beds completely dependent
on care from nurses and doctors, et cetera.
And so that was really where the adversity went from pretty intense to really intense
when I was immobilized and spending months and months and months with no life and no ability
to do anything for myself.
And so that was really the most challenging part of it.
And the longest time that I ever go ahead.
Yeah, you went from one really big extreme to one very far.
I mean, the pendulum went couldn’t have been further really.
Yeah, pretty super athlete to completely helpless.
That’s right.
That’s right.
I mean, what an incredible blow to the ego when it all crashing and shattering of your
sense of who you are.
Yeah.
Yeah.
Yeah.
And I really, I don’t think I really understood just how powerful egoic identity actually is
until that happened.
And of course, when we say ego, we’re not talking about anything related to arrogance,
whatsoever.
I mean, I was quite, I was quite, I was already very much, I suppose, on what we might call
a spiritual path at that time, even though I didn’t really look at it as such, I was
very present.
And I studied Buddhism and I really understood the nature of attachment and how really in
order to be as present as we can, we have to be able to and willing to let go of things
that are impermanent to really embrace that life itself is impermanent.
And all of these things made sense on a conceptual level to me.
And I was very, for where I was at that time of my life, I was pretty far along the path
of embodying this understanding.
But then paralysis really took it to a whole other level where I reckon I had to suddenly
come to terms with, Oh, wow, I can understand this when it has to do with letting go of
attachment to a girlfriend or letting go of attachment to a job or whatever.
But when it comes to actually letting go of attachment to the function of 50% of your
body, that’s a whole other level of attachment where I never, it never even occurred to me
that I would have to let go of attachment on that deep and profound level.
So how was that for you to do that, to go through that?
It was challenging, very challenging.
I am not one to really get the press.
Yeah, I did.
I did.
I’m not one to stay very long in a victim mindset, but I certainly had very a lot of
very depressing moments, more so than depression, I suppose there was a lot of like listlessness
and fear, a fear of really sort of engaging fully with the world.
And I kind of isolated a lot for a while because on some level, I didn’t really want to be
seen, I think, you know, it really, I was, I was kind of, I suppose kind of afraid of
being of other people’s judgments and so forth, being surrounded by people’s judgments and
projections and so forth about who I was and what I was capable of and all of that sort
of stuff.
It took a long time to work through that.
Yeah, you have a lot of experience with that.
I don’t like that.
I think going on to day one.
So tell us about how it started to, to work with you and how it helped you to, did it
have an impact on your spiritual connection?
It did.
It did.
And there were periods where I really kind of, I don’t think I was really feeling a spiritual
connection much at all for a long periods, like somewhere deep down inside of me that
still existed, but it was hard to access.
And especially around, I would say, 2000, full war, 2005, sort of around that era, I
had been in and out of hospitals a lot.
It was really taking its toll on me psychologically and emotionally.
And for a while, I was drinking too much and just and smoking too much weed and just kind
of dissociating without even really realizing it.
And that’s one of the more challenging things is when you’re dissociating, but you’re not
actually realizing you’re dissociating, it just kind of seems like being, you know?
But it’s on trouble with a capital T.
That’s right.
That’s right.
So that was where, you know, that, that it took some time.
And I would say to a certain degree, I was finding little insidious ways, insidious ways
of avoiding a deeper truth for many, many years, finding various different ways of sort of
unconsciously attracting things that would keep me limited, that would reinforce a sense
of limitation, even though I wanted to be without limitation, but I would sort of unconsciously
attract things that would keep that limited sense of self alive for a while.
And it took a while to really experience the full vulnerabilities that was required.
Well, those are two amazing points, Sam, because I think most of our listeners can
relate to a distracting themselves from their adversity because of some difficult experience
like shame or limitation.
Right.
And the next thing you said really was so insightful, I can’t remember what it was right now.
But, and the third, the thing about that you just didn’t know, like you didn’t know that
you were doing this distracting.
Yes, yes.
Right.
And that you kept choosing things that made you limited, and I can really relate to that.
And I’m sure a lot of listeners that when the health fire rises up, right, that you make
choices that reiterate the same, the belief that you have about yourself really unconsciously,
like, I don’t deserve, I’m not enough.
I can’t really.
Yeah.
So what was the, what was the turning point for you?
Like, how do you, you mentioned vulnerability?
So maybe.
Yeah.
So, so it sort of happened in this kind of gradual way where in, let’s see, about 2012,
I was experiencing a lot of challenges in my relationship at the time.
I, I got married in 2012.
I’m, I’m now divorced, but was married in 2012.
And I had a lot of dynamics happening inside of my relationship with my then wife that
were really impossible to navigate without some want, or some kind of help.
And so we got coaching from a really, really good coach who always treated me with a tremendous
amount of respect, but also really was able to help me to identify where I was blocking
myself.
And, and that really revealed a lot to me working with her for many years.
And it was during that time that I actually recognized my own potential as a coach too,
because I recognized that just the transformative power of having someone else see you and reflect
honestly what they see back to you with the aim of helping you to grow through your own
limitations.
And before that, I never really had anyone in my life who had that role.
And so it gave me a tremendous amount of appreciation for the power of that role, which
I still have today when I work with my own clients.
Beautiful.
I can, I’m a little teary because I had the exact same situation happen with me.
And it was when somebody could help me see how I was getting in my own way, how I was
I had against the law, how I was creating and suffering, not directly.
I mean, it was all through, you know, just helping me become more and more aware to like
have those awarenesses myself.
And then I could change my behaviors.
Once, once you.
I want to know more about that.
We have to talk about that over noodle sometime.
I’m ready.
Anytime.
Um, so, okay.
So, so someone had an amazing capacity to see who you were and to work with you in a
way that helped you to see beneath your doubts and your limited view and your probably unconscious
victim, something undeserved, right?
And so, yeah.
Yeah.
And so what was, what was like, was there a moment when sort of you had an aha or.
I think there were many, many aha moments and I’m still getting those aha moments, which
is why I continue to hire mentors and coaches who are at a very high level of consciousness
and who are able to hold up an accurate mirror because those aha’s for me personally, I know
some people have these like glimpses of, of something that’s like, Oh, the light goes
off and they’ve changed forever.
And I would say my and was like a little light here, a little light there, a little light
here, little light there, just kind of gradually expanding my field of awareness and that is
continuing to happen to this day.
And I have a, I think I’ve really cultivated a space of humility around what I don’t know.
I’m always looking for my, what I don’t know to be revealed to me so that I can take in.
Oh, that’s interesting.
I had no idea.
I was even, I had even had that little insidious thought that was keeping me from whatever
it is, you know, so, so I think it’s important for me personally to really embrace life from
that perspective, from that vantage point of, I don’t know, but I’m curious.
I’m really curious to know, not in a way that has any kind of judgment or self consciousness
to it, but as a way of creating usually minute little shifts that can ultimately have a great
impact with time and practice.
Yeah, I love that sound because it’s like one of the hallmarks of an enlightened mind
is being at peace with the unknown and losing your fear or dealing successfully or more
successfully.
I don’t know if we all, any of us deal successfully with the unknown, but more successfully that
you can actually trust that what will unfold is something that will be for your betterment
and life is here to love you, life is for you.
Absolutely.
I love that you’re identifying this very key element, which is making peace with the unknown,
allowing the unknown and allowing awareness of your essential nature to rise up out of
the unknown and show you the truth about who you are.
Instead of having you go along with the cultural conditioning around people in wheelchairs
don’t get to fill in the blank.
Mm-hmm.
Exactly.
Exactly.
To me, it’s really a moment by moment sort of self-diagnosis and sort of reorienting
thing.
Why?
I’ve given up the idea of ever knowing myself as kind of an identity because I know that
the identity is really, it’s an externally facing thing.
We use our biographies, we use our personalities as an externally facing tool, but that to me
isn’t really what’s most important.
Let’s use the analogy of skiing, for example.
I used to be an expert skier before my accident and I’m an expert level adaptive skier, so
I’ve learned how to adapt to being a sit ski and I’ve actually even taught sit skiing a
number of years ago.
I find that the skiing analogy, or you can use a surfing analogy equally as well, they
are a very appropriate analogy because it doesn’t really do me that much good to consider
myself an expert skier.
That is, it’s like, okay, whatever.
So I know kind of the slopes that I’m capable of going down.
I understand the terrain that I’m able to be on.
But what matters the most is the moment by moment, how am I balanced over the ski right
now?
How am I breathing?
Am I aligned?
Am I aware of my body?
Am I aware of my breath?
Am I aware of the ski?
Am I aware of the terrain beneath me?
All of those moment by moment adjustments are really, to me, what makes the sport compelling
and also allows me to be good at skiing.
It’s not, having a label of being an expert skier does not make me good at skiing.
Being able to make fine-tuned adjustments to my body and my breath and my mind at any
given moment are what makes me good at skiing.
And so this is really, this is analogous to what I’m working with when I’m working with
my clients is study how you’re being in each moment as though you’re doing a sport or as
though you’re playing an instrument or as though you’re doing something because really
we are.
And every moment we are in this sort of physical, spiritual, mental balance with our bodies
and with the earth all of the time.
And that really, when you’re attuned in that way, it doesn’t really matter what your sense
of identity is so much because you’re attuning to the physical, mental experience of being
alive inside of yourself.
I love that.
And I think it also is the doorway to all possibilities because as long as you’re holding
yourself and this is a big thing with the no boundaries thing, as long as you’re putting
yourself in a mental concept, which is empty and devoid of real meaning, of course, what
we hold as true and it has meaning and has power over us.
But when you are truly present like what you’re talking about and attuning to your environment
and attuning to your inner environment and your outer environment is how I would recap
what you just said.
Absolutely.
And making the best choices so you get the best results, whatever it is that you want
to go fast, you want to traverse from side to side, you want to stop and talk to people,
whatever, right?
That’s right.
Yeah.
And so I love that if you truly are being attuned to the moment that you, it’s a technique
kind of freeing yourself from the confines of those conditioned identity of who you are,
what you are capable of, what you’re not capable, what you deserve, what you don’t deserve,
etc.
That’s right.
So beautiful of the thing to share so succinctly and so clearly.
Thank you so much.
Oh, thank you.
And likewise, yeah.
Yeah.
You just spelled it out perfectly.
Yeah, it’s in that state of attunement and alignment with the inner environment and the
external environment that you actually have choices.
Like you said, you can go fast, you can go slow, you can traverse, you can stop and talk
to people, but you only have choices when you’re self-aware.
When you’re not self-aware, you are going one direction and one direction only.
And it is not a direction that you’re choosing, but a direction that feels like it’s being
chosen for you based on whatever patterns and beliefs that you’re used to playing out
in your mind.
Yeah.
And so absolutely.
My observation with that is the pattern, the direction is called what I call a downward
spiral.
Mm hmm.
That’s how it’s really more limitation, more suffering, more despair, addiction and the
whole nine yards, right?
Yeah.
And addiction can be something that’s not just drug and alcohol or porn or whatever.
It can also be addiction to certain thoughts.
We can have, that’s where it’s more insidious is where we are addicted to certain ways of
perceiving ourselves.
And then that addiction becomes the fundamental liability.
Yeah, because our thoughts create our reality.
Hello.
Personal development 101, right?
Exactly.
What we’re addicted to the thoughts and actually, you know, Joe to spend this says that great
thing about, um, if you’re using having a certain kind of chemistry going on by having
anxious thoughts and you make a choice to stop the anxious thoughts, it’s just like the
heroin addict who decides to stop doing heroin.
It’s like your body is chemically addicted to that.
If it’s despair or if it’s isolation or if it’s loneliness or if it’s being discombobulated,
whatever, whatever the thing is that you, how you run your energy, how you show up.
And so this is when I’m going to again, make a call out for the importance of having a
guide of having someone who is, has evolved more, you know, ahead of us and who can see
our, our divine light and can help us to recognize how we’re getting our own way and see that
divine more importantly to see that divine light and recognize that that is the truth
of who we are.
So exactly.
Yeah.
Exactly.
So how did your, how did your life change when you started to attune to the moment, be
without, be with the unknown and let that kind of, on the openness be your guide?
I would say it has changed in every single manner or possible.
It is so much more enjoyable and it is so much more free.
And it is, I mean, I, every day, I’m doing exactly what I want to be doing.
Because I’m the one choosing my direction versus feeling like there’s any kind of force
that is choosing my direction for me.
And that is the most freeing thing imaginable.
And now I have friends, colleagues, et cetera, who are all in a, who have been magnetized
by that frequency of freedom, the frequency that I’m operating from, where as before,
I would attract certain people and circumstances into my life that would be a match for that
unconscious victimhood mentality, where I wasn’t choosing my full power, I would be
constantly attracting things to affirm that so that it would continue to reinforce that
perspective.
And now I keep attracting.
I don’t want to make a point there that whether you’re seeing yourself as limited and deficient,
or if you’re seeing yourself as a divine light and in total celebration, you attract that.
That’s right.
That’s right.
The thing about manifestation that most people don’t recognize is that manifestation is happening
so fully and completely on every moment in every moment.
We cannot help but be manifesters.
It’s so funny when you hear someone say, I’m either like, great at manifesting or I am
challenged with manifesting.
No, you’re not.
You are actually manifesting exactly what your system has chosen to manifest right now
for the particular place of learning and evolution that you’re in right now.
Otherwise, it wouldn’t be here for you in your life as it is.
And so it’s really important that we get really honest with ourselves because we can manifest
if we are making excuses for why we’re not in our full power, we are going to manifest
experiences that reflect that exact thing just in the same way.
I would add in their joy, our full power and our full joy.
Right, right, right.
I put those two things together really is the same.
That’s a year ago.
Yeah.
Yeah.
Really, a big, muscly, brilliant.
Anyway, I’m sorry, I didn’t mean to interrupt you.
No, no, no problem.
I agree completely.
Two times this thoughts come up and so I’m going to mention it, which is I was having
a conversation with, which is the nature of the trickiness of the limited self or the
ego identity to keep us under wraps and to not even when we say we’re going to do this
thing at New Year’s and we take on these new practices and maybe even get a coach or a
spiritual teacher and go do sit on the cushion and like we’re doing all of these things,
but we still keep creating the same scenario again and again.
I mean, maybe something sort of on the peripheral change, but the thing that is your real heart’s
desire does not change.
And I think that I want to see if you can speak to that for a moment.
Yeah.
Yeah.
Well, what you’re sharing with me, what that brings up for me is and even as I’m saying,
it brings up for me, et cetera, what you’re sharing with me is we are constantly applying
this personal pronoun to everything.
I, me, my experience, et cetera, et cetera.
It is so insidious and it shadows our awareness in every moment so much so that it attaches
and we believe that that voice is part of the absolute reality, but that that voice is
constantly creating a self-consciousness loop that is impossible to get it out out of
at the level of the loop.
So that’s what you’re, why, like, that’s what I’m hearing about the insidiousness of it is
the self-conscious loop is constantly going, I am having this experience.
I am this.
I am that I am spiritually evolving.
I’m sitting on this meditation cushion.
I am this.
I’m trying to improve myself.
And you brought up Despensa earlier, one of the things I, the title of the book that
I really like is Breaking the Habit of Being Yourself.
So the self-conscious sort of looping that is so habitual that we believe that it is essential,
but actually the true self is not bound by a singular identity.
The true self is in alignment with divine consciousness and recognizing that we are imposing
the story, this narrative about ourselves and our experience on every moment.
That’s the tricky thing that needs to be broken if one wants to really expand past that insidious,
repetitive, continuing to be, you know, you might find out that your goals aren’t even
related to what you thought they were because your goals were coming from a limited idea
of who you were in the first place.
So a goal that someone else imposed on you.
Exactly.
Or for sure you do fulfill for their gratification or their feeling of not being shamed of their
kid or their student or whatever.
Yeah.
Mom and dad’s unlived dreams or the culture’s expectations or whatever is alive inside
of you that it does doesn’t even really belong to you, but is part of some idea, some meme
that was downloaded into your psyche.
Yeah.
So you’ve touched on so many amazing things today, Sam.
I would love to continue our conversation for a long time.
And I want to give my listeners an option to get back to their life.
So I just want to do a little recap here of mentioning some of the amazing things that
you talked about.
Oh, sure.
I was hoping to go on for hours.
I know you were so sorry.
I wasn’t Joe Rogan in doing a two hour interview.
Well, I see that could easily happen and maybe we’ll do that again another time.
Sure thing.
So, but some of the things that I thought that you touched on that were so amazing was
that one of the things I was really impressed about was that you sort of bore through the
process of your illness and your increased complications with bed sores and all that
stuff, right?
That you that you persevered through all of that.
And then that you started to kind of you.
Oh, I think that you mentioned that you went to coaching and that you brought in a third,
a person, a witness of your higher self that started to mirror to you and started to probably
ask you some powerful questions that were helped that was helping you to get out of
that limitedness.
You know, we could talk a lot about whatever all the details of that, right?
And then you started making space for the unknown and trusting that life loves you and
opening up to the moment, present, practicing practices where you’re aware of what’s going
on inside and what’s going on outside and attuning to the moment so that you could optimize
your experience, right?
And then choices, of course, choice choosing and choosing who we are and what we want to
create and noticing our power is manifester.
What else would you say that I missed?
That was pretty much covered all the bases.
Like, or at least.
Okay.
So any other thing that you would like to leave our audience with on the topic of your
journey from adversity to awakening, transforming your hardships into greater spiritual connection
and joy?
Yeah, well, it’s going to probably sound trite, but there is an infinite power that resides
inside of you no matter what your circumstances are.
And I know that if I’ve tapped into it, that others can tap into it as well.
And it really is a process of developing a deeper and deeper and more profoundly insightful
relationship with the entire body, because the entire body is it is the nervous system.
It’s not just your head.
It’s not just your thoughts.
Knowing that inquisitive, curious, moment by moment relationship with your entire body
is the best way of getting out of a limited perspective that is based on thought.
Very beautiful.
So what is the thought process if you want to become more aware of your body, of your
thoughts?
Recognizing that your attention and your thoughts are different things where you place your
attention doesn’t have to be on the constant stream of thoughts.
You can place your attention just like meditation teachers and yogis have taught for thousands
of years.
You can place your attention on your breath.
You can place your attention on the source of thought versus thought itself.
What is the source of thought?
Wow.
You can place your attention on the sensations of energy inside of your body.
Your attention is up to you where you place it.
Yes.
And I’d like to share on that topic from my practice.
I’m a student of the Diamond approach and my teacher, Hummed, shares something similar
to what you said a little while ago about they’re not being complete.
There’s no end to our development.
You’re not an expert coach, you’re not an expert speaker.
You’re in the process of becoming a better whatever.
Right?
And his whole thing is that enlightenment process, there is no final state of consciousness.
It’s just the mystery of life just continues to deepen and open to more and more wonder,
dimensions and amazement.
So you guys are very much in alignment that way.
And the practice that we do with that is inquiry.
And so the question that I often ask myself is, what’s the truth of my experience now?
And I inward and notice what’s happening inside my emotional body, my physical body.
And I take in also what’s going on with my environment.
And as I just stay and there’s a process of inquiry that we do where we share with another
person and speak without being interrupted for a while.
And follow that thread of what’s happening and invariably, it’s like a portal to the
dimension of your whole self, of your true self.
And I’d be happy to share with anybody that process anytime.
It’s like, yeah, it’s in it was like, I also related to when you said you had many ahas.
For me has been like many, many, many ahas of knowing that the culture has an idea that
little people are less than, but I’ll relate to that at all anymore.
So yeah, anyway, you used that as a perfect foundation for your own growth and evolution,
which I think is something that we share in common is that we have taken our physical
circumstances and gone, Oh, how can I use this for my soul’s evolution versus looking at
it from the perspective of limitation?
Well, the thing that’s interesting about that and it’s relevant to our topic is that I didn’t
start out like that.
I just wanted to be happy.
Sure.
Yeah.
I was like, I’m miserable.
I’m suffering.
I’m begging my head against the wall here.
I want to have a different experience.
And as I got help and applied myself and was a lot of quality, like determination, persistence,
honesty, courage, all of that developed in me.
And I was able to walk the path.
And then I started having all these amazing spiritual, you know, awarenesses and connections.
And I found that then actually I could connect with another person in a real way.
And I could connect with nature in a way that touched me in a very deep way, et cetera.
And then the quality of my life, it wasn’t about being happy anymore.
It was about having the life that was like, gems.
Beautiful.
Yeah.
You found something deeper than happiness.
Exactly.
So you too, my friend.
So thanks to Ben Warrior.
Thank you for being with us today.
I’m so happy.
Thank you, Peggy.
Yeah, really fantastic to chat with you in this way.
Thank you for sharing all of your vulnerability, your struggles, being honest, your kindness
and your wisdom.
Appreciate it.
It’s my pleasure.
Thank you for having me on your show.
Okay, good.
Mm-hmm.

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The Soul of Leadership with Sam Morris

– Founder of Zen Warrior Training –

Intro to Episode

Welcome to the From Adversity to Awakening podcast, where we explore transformative journeys of resilience and self-discovery. In this episode, we’re honored to have as our guest, Sam Morris, a beacon of strength and wisdom. As the founder of Zen Warrior Training, Sam brings unparalleled expertise in guiding individuals, teams, and organizations towards a leadership mindset rooted in mindfulness and empowerment.


Despite facing life-altering adversity, Sam’s journey from paralysis to profound spiritual awakening showcases the power of resilience and the human spirit. Join us as we delve into Sam’s extraordinary insights and learn how to navigate life’s challenges with grace and resilience.

Play Video about Sam Morris
February 5, 2024

Interview Summary

Host Peggy O’Neill welcomes special guest Sam Morris to discuss his journey from adversity to awakening. Sam, the owner of Zen Warrior Training, shares his story of becoming paraplegic at 24 and transforming his hardships into spiritual connection and joy.

The conversation covers Sam’s initial struggles, including bed sores and hospitalization, and how coaching and self-awareness played a crucial role in his transformation. Sam emphasizes the importance of attuning to the present moment, letting go of egoic identity, and making choices aligned with one’s true self. The discussion touches on the insidious nature of self-conscious loops, the power of self-awareness, and the continuous process of growth. Sam encourages listeners to explore a deeper relationship with their entire bodies and shift attention from constant thought to the present moment.

Both Peggy and Sam highlight the significance of choosing one’s direction in life, breaking free from limiting beliefs, and recognizing the power of manifestation. The conversation concludes with a shared perspective on the ongoing, evolving nature of the enlightenment process. Overall, the podcast delves into profound insights about personal growth, self-awareness, and embracing the unknown to find true freedom and joy.

Bio

Sam Warren Morris is the founder of Zen Warrior Training and the creator of Leadership TectonX, a leadership performance program that focuses on cultivating the optimal mindset for navigating the most disruptive period in human history with effectiveness and agility. In 1999, just after leading a cycling trek across the United States, Sam was in a car accident which left him paraplegic. Moving through the trauma of paralysis gave Sam a deeply embodied appreciation for the ability for the mind and body to adapt and find the gifts in any challenge. Currently, in addition to his work with entrepreneurs and executives, Sam is developing a leadership mindset training program for caregivers caring for individuals who have are rehabilitating from a neurological trauma. Sam is also developing a docuseries about the world’s most highly accomplished disabled outdoor adventure leaders and authoring a book.

Video Transcript

*This transcript was generated automatically. Its accuracy may vary.

Hi, welcome everybody.
Welcome to the From Adversity to Awakening show.
I’m your host Peggy O’Neill.
I’m so glad you’re here today.
I have a very special guest, Sam Morris, ta-da-da-da.
And Sam is going to share with us his story about moving from adversity to awakening,
transforming his hardships into greater spiritual connection and joy.
So welcome Sam.
Yeah, yeah, nice to see you.
So Sam and I met at H.E.L. a couple of months ago, the Association of Transformational Leaders,
and he had a very stellar presence.
And we got to chatting.
We had a very meaningful conversation.
I asked him to come enlighten you all about what he, enlighten you from his perspective,
his wisdom that he’s gained through his life.
So Sam is the owner and presenter and the generator of an organization called Zen Warrior
Training.
And he helps individuals and teams and corporation and other places to bring in leadership mindset.
So this is an awesome empowering thing.
And I also love that Sam, I have to read it, is a ambassador of no barriers USA, which
empowers people with disabilities to live with no boundaries.
So Sam, as you can’t see in a wheelchair, he’s had an accident 24 years ago.
And for the last 10 years, he has discovered his inner light and been shining it into the
world.
So welcome Sam.
Thank you, Peggy.
Thank you.
It’s so great to be here with you.
Yeah, thanks to be here with you.
So I would love for you to share with our audience who are eager to hear your stories.
So compelling.
I can, what do they call that, spoiler alert, about your journey with having adversity,
like the biggest adversity that, or adversities that you have experienced in your life and
how that impacted you from at the beginning about then the transfer.
Yeah.
Yeah.
Yeah.
So my big adversity started a little over 24 years ago, which was, I just got to the
point since I’m 48 right now, I just got to the point where I’ve now spent more of my
life paraplegic than I did before then.
But I was 24 when the accident that left me paraplegic happened.
I was riding the backseat of a car with a driver with a driver who had been drinking.
He lost control of the car, went off the road, hit a tree.
And my spine broke at the level of T-12, which is around where your belly button is.
So I became completely paralyzed, no sensation, no motor function from that point down when
that happened.
And I just finished cycling across the United States when that happened.
So I was really athletic.
I was not this type of person who was just sitting around all day.
I was someone who was using his legs all the time.
You know, it was not just walking, but cycling, snowboarding, skiing, et cetera.
It was my whole lifestyle and whole identity really revolved around the use of my entire
body.
I was six foot three, suddenly in a wheelchair.
But that was only the beginning.
And your eye level with me.
No, eye level with you exactly, exactly, exactly.
Maybe even a little bit taller actually.
But yeah, not only, but that was just kind of the beginning of the adversity actually.
And what many people don’t realize is that I spent years in and out of hospitals with
bed sores, which turned into large ulcers, which I had to have surgery on.
And I actually spent over two years completely immobilized in hospital beds completely dependent
on care from nurses and doctors, et cetera.
And so that was really where the adversity went from pretty intense to really intense
when I was immobilized and spending months and months and months with no life and no ability
to do anything for myself.
And so that was really the most challenging part of it.
And the longest time that I ever go ahead.
Yeah, you went from one really big extreme to one very far.
I mean, the pendulum went couldn’t have been further really.
Yeah, pretty super athlete to completely helpless.
That’s right.
That’s right.
I mean, what an incredible blow to the ego when it all crashing and shattering of your
sense of who you are.
Yeah.
Yeah.
Yeah.
And I really, I don’t think I really understood just how powerful egoic identity actually is
until that happened.
And of course, when we say ego, we’re not talking about anything related to arrogance,
whatsoever.
I mean, I was quite, I was quite, I was already very much, I suppose, on what we might call
a spiritual path at that time, even though I didn’t really look at it as such, I was
very present.
And I studied Buddhism and I really understood the nature of attachment and how really in
order to be as present as we can, we have to be able to and willing to let go of things
that are impermanent to really embrace that life itself is impermanent.
And all of these things made sense on a conceptual level to me.
And I was very, for where I was at that time of my life, I was pretty far along the path
of embodying this understanding.
But then paralysis really took it to a whole other level where I reckon I had to suddenly
come to terms with, Oh, wow, I can understand this when it has to do with letting go of
attachment to a girlfriend or letting go of attachment to a job or whatever.
But when it comes to actually letting go of attachment to the function of 50% of your
body, that’s a whole other level of attachment where I never, it never even occurred to me
that I would have to let go of attachment on that deep and profound level.
So how was that for you to do that, to go through that?
It was challenging, very challenging.
I am not one to really get the press.
Yeah, I did.
I did.
I’m not one to stay very long in a victim mindset, but I certainly had very a lot of
very depressing moments, more so than depression, I suppose there was a lot of like listlessness
and fear, a fear of really sort of engaging fully with the world.
And I kind of isolated a lot for a while because on some level, I didn’t really want to be
seen, I think, you know, it really, I was, I was kind of, I suppose kind of afraid of
being of other people’s judgments and so forth, being surrounded by people’s judgments and
projections and so forth about who I was and what I was capable of and all of that sort
of stuff.
It took a long time to work through that.
Yeah, you have a lot of experience with that.
I don’t like that.
I think going on to day one.
So tell us about how it started to, to work with you and how it helped you to, did it
have an impact on your spiritual connection?
It did.
It did.
And there were periods where I really kind of, I don’t think I was really feeling a spiritual
connection much at all for a long periods, like somewhere deep down inside of me that
still existed, but it was hard to access.
And especially around, I would say, 2000, full war, 2005, sort of around that era, I
had been in and out of hospitals a lot.
It was really taking its toll on me psychologically and emotionally.
And for a while, I was drinking too much and just and smoking too much weed and just kind
of dissociating without even really realizing it.
And that’s one of the more challenging things is when you’re dissociating, but you’re not
actually realizing you’re dissociating, it just kind of seems like being, you know?
But it’s on trouble with a capital T.
That’s right.
That’s right.
So that was where, you know, that, that it took some time.
And I would say to a certain degree, I was finding little insidious ways, insidious ways
of avoiding a deeper truth for many, many years, finding various different ways of sort of
unconsciously attracting things that would keep me limited, that would reinforce a sense
of limitation, even though I wanted to be without limitation, but I would sort of unconsciously
attract things that would keep that limited sense of self alive for a while.
And it took a while to really experience the full vulnerabilities that was required.
Well, those are two amazing points, Sam, because I think most of our listeners can
relate to a distracting themselves from their adversity because of some difficult experience
like shame or limitation.
Right.
And the next thing you said really was so insightful, I can’t remember what it was right now.
But, and the third, the thing about that you just didn’t know, like you didn’t know that
you were doing this distracting.
Yes, yes.
Right.
And that you kept choosing things that made you limited, and I can really relate to that.
And I’m sure a lot of listeners that when the health fire rises up, right, that you make
choices that reiterate the same, the belief that you have about yourself really unconsciously,
like, I don’t deserve, I’m not enough.
I can’t really.
Yeah.
So what was the, what was the turning point for you?
Like, how do you, you mentioned vulnerability?
So maybe.
Yeah.
So, so it sort of happened in this kind of gradual way where in, let’s see, about 2012,
I was experiencing a lot of challenges in my relationship at the time.
I, I got married in 2012.
I’m, I’m now divorced, but was married in 2012.
And I had a lot of dynamics happening inside of my relationship with my then wife that
were really impossible to navigate without some want, or some kind of help.
And so we got coaching from a really, really good coach who always treated me with a tremendous
amount of respect, but also really was able to help me to identify where I was blocking
myself.
And, and that really revealed a lot to me working with her for many years.
And it was during that time that I actually recognized my own potential as a coach too,
because I recognized that just the transformative power of having someone else see you and reflect
honestly what they see back to you with the aim of helping you to grow through your own
limitations.
And before that, I never really had anyone in my life who had that role.
And so it gave me a tremendous amount of appreciation for the power of that role, which
I still have today when I work with my own clients.
Beautiful.
I can, I’m a little teary because I had the exact same situation happen with me.
And it was when somebody could help me see how I was getting in my own way, how I was
I had against the law, how I was creating and suffering, not directly.
I mean, it was all through, you know, just helping me become more and more aware to like
have those awarenesses myself.
And then I could change my behaviors.
Once, once you.
I want to know more about that.
We have to talk about that over noodle sometime.
I’m ready.
Anytime.
Um, so, okay.
So, so someone had an amazing capacity to see who you were and to work with you in a
way that helped you to see beneath your doubts and your limited view and your probably unconscious
victim, something undeserved, right?
And so, yeah.
Yeah.
And so what was, what was like, was there a moment when sort of you had an aha or.
I think there were many, many aha moments and I’m still getting those aha moments, which
is why I continue to hire mentors and coaches who are at a very high level of consciousness
and who are able to hold up an accurate mirror because those aha’s for me personally, I know
some people have these like glimpses of, of something that’s like, Oh, the light goes
off and they’ve changed forever.
And I would say my and was like a little light here, a little light there, a little light
here, little light there, just kind of gradually expanding my field of awareness and that is
continuing to happen to this day.
And I have a, I think I’ve really cultivated a space of humility around what I don’t know.
I’m always looking for my, what I don’t know to be revealed to me so that I can take in.
Oh, that’s interesting.
I had no idea.
I was even, I had even had that little insidious thought that was keeping me from whatever
it is, you know, so, so I think it’s important for me personally to really embrace life from
that perspective, from that vantage point of, I don’t know, but I’m curious.
I’m really curious to know, not in a way that has any kind of judgment or self consciousness
to it, but as a way of creating usually minute little shifts that can ultimately have a great
impact with time and practice.
Yeah, I love that sound because it’s like one of the hallmarks of an enlightened mind
is being at peace with the unknown and losing your fear or dealing successfully or more
successfully.
I don’t know if we all, any of us deal successfully with the unknown, but more successfully that
you can actually trust that what will unfold is something that will be for your betterment
and life is here to love you, life is for you.
Absolutely.
I love that you’re identifying this very key element, which is making peace with the unknown,
allowing the unknown and allowing awareness of your essential nature to rise up out of
the unknown and show you the truth about who you are.
Instead of having you go along with the cultural conditioning around people in wheelchairs
don’t get to fill in the blank.
Mm-hmm.
Exactly.
Exactly.
To me, it’s really a moment by moment sort of self-diagnosis and sort of reorienting
thing.
Why?
I’ve given up the idea of ever knowing myself as kind of an identity because I know that
the identity is really, it’s an externally facing thing.
We use our biographies, we use our personalities as an externally facing tool, but that to me
isn’t really what’s most important.
Let’s use the analogy of skiing, for example.
I used to be an expert skier before my accident and I’m an expert level adaptive skier, so
I’ve learned how to adapt to being a sit ski and I’ve actually even taught sit skiing a
number of years ago.
I find that the skiing analogy, or you can use a surfing analogy equally as well, they
are a very appropriate analogy because it doesn’t really do me that much good to consider
myself an expert skier.
That is, it’s like, okay, whatever.
So I know kind of the slopes that I’m capable of going down.
I understand the terrain that I’m able to be on.
But what matters the most is the moment by moment, how am I balanced over the ski right
now?
How am I breathing?
Am I aligned?
Am I aware of my body?
Am I aware of my breath?
Am I aware of the ski?
Am I aware of the terrain beneath me?
All of those moment by moment adjustments are really, to me, what makes the sport compelling
and also allows me to be good at skiing.
It’s not, having a label of being an expert skier does not make me good at skiing.
Being able to make fine-tuned adjustments to my body and my breath and my mind at any
given moment are what makes me good at skiing.
And so this is really, this is analogous to what I’m working with when I’m working with
my clients is study how you’re being in each moment as though you’re doing a sport or as
though you’re playing an instrument or as though you’re doing something because really
we are.
And every moment we are in this sort of physical, spiritual, mental balance with our bodies
and with the earth all of the time.
And that really, when you’re attuned in that way, it doesn’t really matter what your sense
of identity is so much because you’re attuning to the physical, mental experience of being
alive inside of yourself.
I love that.
And I think it also is the doorway to all possibilities because as long as you’re holding
yourself and this is a big thing with the no boundaries thing, as long as you’re putting
yourself in a mental concept, which is empty and devoid of real meaning, of course, what
we hold as true and it has meaning and has power over us.
But when you are truly present like what you’re talking about and attuning to your environment
and attuning to your inner environment and your outer environment is how I would recap
what you just said.
Absolutely.
And making the best choices so you get the best results, whatever it is that you want
to go fast, you want to traverse from side to side, you want to stop and talk to people,
whatever, right?
That’s right.
Yeah.
And so I love that if you truly are being attuned to the moment that you, it’s a technique
kind of freeing yourself from the confines of those conditioned identity of who you are,
what you are capable of, what you’re not capable, what you deserve, what you don’t deserve,
etc.
That’s right.
So beautiful of the thing to share so succinctly and so clearly.
Thank you so much.
Oh, thank you.
And likewise, yeah.
Yeah.
You just spelled it out perfectly.
Yeah, it’s in that state of attunement and alignment with the inner environment and the
external environment that you actually have choices.
Like you said, you can go fast, you can go slow, you can traverse, you can stop and talk
to people, but you only have choices when you’re self-aware.
When you’re not self-aware, you are going one direction and one direction only.
And it is not a direction that you’re choosing, but a direction that feels like it’s being
chosen for you based on whatever patterns and beliefs that you’re used to playing out
in your mind.
Yeah.
And so absolutely.
My observation with that is the pattern, the direction is called what I call a downward
spiral.
Mm hmm.
That’s how it’s really more limitation, more suffering, more despair, addiction and the
whole nine yards, right?
Yeah.
And addiction can be something that’s not just drug and alcohol or porn or whatever.
It can also be addiction to certain thoughts.
We can have, that’s where it’s more insidious is where we are addicted to certain ways of
perceiving ourselves.
And then that addiction becomes the fundamental liability.
Yeah, because our thoughts create our reality.
Hello.
Personal development 101, right?
Exactly.
What we’re addicted to the thoughts and actually, you know, Joe to spend this says that great
thing about, um, if you’re using having a certain kind of chemistry going on by having
anxious thoughts and you make a choice to stop the anxious thoughts, it’s just like the
heroin addict who decides to stop doing heroin.
It’s like your body is chemically addicted to that.
If it’s despair or if it’s isolation or if it’s loneliness or if it’s being discombobulated,
whatever, whatever the thing is that you, how you run your energy, how you show up.
And so this is when I’m going to again, make a call out for the importance of having a
guide of having someone who is, has evolved more, you know, ahead of us and who can see
our, our divine light and can help us to recognize how we’re getting our own way and see that
divine more importantly to see that divine light and recognize that that is the truth
of who we are.
So exactly.
Yeah.
Exactly.
So how did your, how did your life change when you started to attune to the moment, be
without, be with the unknown and let that kind of, on the openness be your guide?
I would say it has changed in every single manner or possible.
It is so much more enjoyable and it is so much more free.
And it is, I mean, I, every day, I’m doing exactly what I want to be doing.
Because I’m the one choosing my direction versus feeling like there’s any kind of force
that is choosing my direction for me.
And that is the most freeing thing imaginable.
And now I have friends, colleagues, et cetera, who are all in a, who have been magnetized
by that frequency of freedom, the frequency that I’m operating from, where as before,
I would attract certain people and circumstances into my life that would be a match for that
unconscious victimhood mentality, where I wasn’t choosing my full power, I would be
constantly attracting things to affirm that so that it would continue to reinforce that
perspective.
And now I keep attracting.
I don’t want to make a point there that whether you’re seeing yourself as limited and deficient,
or if you’re seeing yourself as a divine light and in total celebration, you attract that.
That’s right.
That’s right.
The thing about manifestation that most people don’t recognize is that manifestation is happening
so fully and completely on every moment in every moment.
We cannot help but be manifesters.
It’s so funny when you hear someone say, I’m either like, great at manifesting or I am
challenged with manifesting.
No, you’re not.
You are actually manifesting exactly what your system has chosen to manifest right now
for the particular place of learning and evolution that you’re in right now.
Otherwise, it wouldn’t be here for you in your life as it is.
And so it’s really important that we get really honest with ourselves because we can manifest
if we are making excuses for why we’re not in our full power, we are going to manifest
experiences that reflect that exact thing just in the same way.
I would add in their joy, our full power and our full joy.
Right, right, right.
I put those two things together really is the same.
That’s a year ago.
Yeah.
Yeah.
Really, a big, muscly, brilliant.
Anyway, I’m sorry, I didn’t mean to interrupt you.
No, no, no problem.
I agree completely.
Two times this thoughts come up and so I’m going to mention it, which is I was having
a conversation with, which is the nature of the trickiness of the limited self or the
ego identity to keep us under wraps and to not even when we say we’re going to do this
thing at New Year’s and we take on these new practices and maybe even get a coach or a
spiritual teacher and go do sit on the cushion and like we’re doing all of these things,
but we still keep creating the same scenario again and again.
I mean, maybe something sort of on the peripheral change, but the thing that is your real heart’s
desire does not change.
And I think that I want to see if you can speak to that for a moment.
Yeah.
Yeah.
Well, what you’re sharing with me, what that brings up for me is and even as I’m saying,
it brings up for me, et cetera, what you’re sharing with me is we are constantly applying
this personal pronoun to everything.
I, me, my experience, et cetera, et cetera.
It is so insidious and it shadows our awareness in every moment so much so that it attaches
and we believe that that voice is part of the absolute reality, but that that voice is
constantly creating a self-consciousness loop that is impossible to get it out out of
at the level of the loop.
So that’s what you’re, why, like, that’s what I’m hearing about the insidiousness of it is
the self-conscious loop is constantly going, I am having this experience.
I am this.
I am that I am spiritually evolving.
I’m sitting on this meditation cushion.
I am this.
I’m trying to improve myself.
And you brought up Despensa earlier, one of the things I, the title of the book that
I really like is Breaking the Habit of Being Yourself.
So the self-conscious sort of looping that is so habitual that we believe that it is essential,
but actually the true self is not bound by a singular identity.
The true self is in alignment with divine consciousness and recognizing that we are imposing
the story, this narrative about ourselves and our experience on every moment.
That’s the tricky thing that needs to be broken if one wants to really expand past that insidious,
repetitive, continuing to be, you know, you might find out that your goals aren’t even
related to what you thought they were because your goals were coming from a limited idea
of who you were in the first place.
So a goal that someone else imposed on you.
Exactly.
Or for sure you do fulfill for their gratification or their feeling of not being shamed of their
kid or their student or whatever.
Yeah.
Mom and dad’s unlived dreams or the culture’s expectations or whatever is alive inside
of you that it does doesn’t even really belong to you, but is part of some idea, some meme
that was downloaded into your psyche.
Yeah.
So you’ve touched on so many amazing things today, Sam.
I would love to continue our conversation for a long time.
And I want to give my listeners an option to get back to their life.
So I just want to do a little recap here of mentioning some of the amazing things that
you talked about.
Oh, sure.
I was hoping to go on for hours.
I know you were so sorry.
I wasn’t Joe Rogan in doing a two hour interview.
Well, I see that could easily happen and maybe we’ll do that again another time.
Sure thing.
So, but some of the things that I thought that you touched on that were so amazing was
that one of the things I was really impressed about was that you sort of bore through the
process of your illness and your increased complications with bed sores and all that
stuff, right?
That you that you persevered through all of that.
And then that you started to kind of you.
Oh, I think that you mentioned that you went to coaching and that you brought in a third,
a person, a witness of your higher self that started to mirror to you and started to probably
ask you some powerful questions that were helped that was helping you to get out of
that limitedness.
You know, we could talk a lot about whatever all the details of that, right?
And then you started making space for the unknown and trusting that life loves you and
opening up to the moment, present, practicing practices where you’re aware of what’s going
on inside and what’s going on outside and attuning to the moment so that you could optimize
your experience, right?
And then choices, of course, choice choosing and choosing who we are and what we want to
create and noticing our power is manifester.
What else would you say that I missed?
That was pretty much covered all the bases.
Like, or at least.
Okay.
So any other thing that you would like to leave our audience with on the topic of your
journey from adversity to awakening, transforming your hardships into greater spiritual connection
and joy?
Yeah, well, it’s going to probably sound trite, but there is an infinite power that resides
inside of you no matter what your circumstances are.
And I know that if I’ve tapped into it, that others can tap into it as well.
And it really is a process of developing a deeper and deeper and more profoundly insightful
relationship with the entire body, because the entire body is it is the nervous system.
It’s not just your head.
It’s not just your thoughts.
Knowing that inquisitive, curious, moment by moment relationship with your entire body
is the best way of getting out of a limited perspective that is based on thought.
Very beautiful.
So what is the thought process if you want to become more aware of your body, of your
thoughts?
Recognizing that your attention and your thoughts are different things where you place your
attention doesn’t have to be on the constant stream of thoughts.
You can place your attention just like meditation teachers and yogis have taught for thousands
of years.
You can place your attention on your breath.
You can place your attention on the source of thought versus thought itself.
What is the source of thought?
Wow.
You can place your attention on the sensations of energy inside of your body.
Your attention is up to you where you place it.
Yes.
And I’d like to share on that topic from my practice.
I’m a student of the Diamond approach and my teacher, Hummed, shares something similar
to what you said a little while ago about they’re not being complete.
There’s no end to our development.
You’re not an expert coach, you’re not an expert speaker.
You’re in the process of becoming a better whatever.
Right?
And his whole thing is that enlightenment process, there is no final state of consciousness.
It’s just the mystery of life just continues to deepen and open to more and more wonder,
dimensions and amazement.
So you guys are very much in alignment that way.
And the practice that we do with that is inquiry.
And so the question that I often ask myself is, what’s the truth of my experience now?
And I inward and notice what’s happening inside my emotional body, my physical body.
And I take in also what’s going on with my environment.
And as I just stay and there’s a process of inquiry that we do where we share with another
person and speak without being interrupted for a while.
And follow that thread of what’s happening and invariably, it’s like a portal to the
dimension of your whole self, of your true self.
And I’d be happy to share with anybody that process anytime.
It’s like, yeah, it’s in it was like, I also related to when you said you had many ahas.
For me has been like many, many, many ahas of knowing that the culture has an idea that
little people are less than, but I’ll relate to that at all anymore.
So yeah, anyway, you used that as a perfect foundation for your own growth and evolution,
which I think is something that we share in common is that we have taken our physical
circumstances and gone, Oh, how can I use this for my soul’s evolution versus looking at
it from the perspective of limitation?
Well, the thing that’s interesting about that and it’s relevant to our topic is that I didn’t
start out like that.
I just wanted to be happy.
Sure.
Yeah.
I was like, I’m miserable.
I’m suffering.
I’m begging my head against the wall here.
I want to have a different experience.
And as I got help and applied myself and was a lot of quality, like determination, persistence,
honesty, courage, all of that developed in me.
And I was able to walk the path.
And then I started having all these amazing spiritual, you know, awarenesses and connections.
And I found that then actually I could connect with another person in a real way.
And I could connect with nature in a way that touched me in a very deep way, et cetera.
And then the quality of my life, it wasn’t about being happy anymore.
It was about having the life that was like, gems.
Beautiful.
Yeah.
You found something deeper than happiness.
Exactly.
So you too, my friend.
So thanks to Ben Warrior.
Thank you for being with us today.
I’m so happy.
Thank you, Peggy.
Yeah, really fantastic to chat with you in this way.
Thank you for sharing all of your vulnerability, your struggles, being honest, your kindness
and your wisdom.
Appreciate it.
It’s my pleasure.
Thank you for having me on your show.
Okay, good.
Mm-hmm.

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